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Charvonne Holliday Presents at American Public Health Association’s Annual Conference

Charvonne at APHA

In November  2013, Charvonne Holliday presented a session at the American Public Health Association’s annual conference entitled:  “Using the Expanded Chronic Care Model in an International Initiative to Address the Chronicity of Pediatric Asthma in a Clinical Setting.”

The objectives of the presentation were to describe the process of implementing the Expanded Chronic Care model in a pediatric clinical setting and to discuss the importance of identifying, monitoring and addressing co-existing health concern in the clinical setting.

Based on the tenets of the Expanded Chronic Care Model, a comprehensive, clinical tool has been developed to improve the health and well-being of pediatric asthma patients. Contingent on patients’ self-reported conditions, individuals were referred to one or more interventions that address physical activity, nutrition, tobacco exposure, violence, and well-being. Specifically, preliminary health data was reported for consenting patients who received the intervention (n=13) and patients who did not (n=6). All patients received a motivational interview and consultation with a physician. The treatment group had a significantly higher BMI (p<0.01) and had one or more underlying health concerns. Shortly after beginning the intervention, the treatment group had better asthma control compared to the non-intervention group (p=0.16). However, nocturnal symptoms decreased significantly for both groups (p=0.02) as did reported exacerbations (p=0.06). The percentage of children who controlled their asthma with therapy slightly increased over time and the percentage of children who increased their control without medication also increased over time, bordering significance.  Since the analysis of this pilot data, 86 additional patients have been included in the study.

If you would like more information on this topic, feel free to contact Charvonne at C.Holliday@wriwindber.org

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